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Jim Maxka, DPM

Hanover (717) 524-1034


April 2022

Tuesday, 26 April 2022 00:00

Two Types of Plantar Warts

It can be easy to notice a plantar wart, which is a small, hardened area on the bottom of the foot. They may have tiny black dots in the center and grow into the foot as a result of the pressure that is exerted by standing and walking. The medical term for this ailment is verruca plantaris, and it is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). It is considered to be contagious, and enters the body through small cracks in the skin of the feet. Research has shown there are two types of plantar warts. A single plantar wart is classified as a solitary plantar wart, though smaller warts may form from it. Mosaic plantar warts are found in clusters and may require more extensive treatment methods. Patients who have compromised immune systems may be susceptible to developing these types of warts, in addition to children and older people. Prevention techniques can include wearing appropriate footwear while in public shower rooms, locker rooms, or swimming pools. If you think you have plantar warts, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can provide you with correct treatment options. 

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
Wednesday, 20 April 2022 00:00

Common Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the fibrous ligament that stretches from the heel to the toes on the bottom of the foot, called the plantar fascia, becomes strained or even torn. The plantar fascia is prone to injury as it bears the body’s weight while walking and jumping. People who stand at work or overly stress the plantar fascia doing excessive repetitive movements during athletics are more at risk for developing this condition, which is the most common form of heel pain. Other risk factors include having flat feet or high arches, as well as wearing improper shoes or running on hard surfaces. Type 2 diabetes and certain rheumatic disorders are also risk factors. A podiatrist can often diagnose plantar fasciitis with just a physical exam, however, X-rays may also be used to rule out other possible conditions. If you believe you have developed plantar fasciitis, make an appointment with a podiatrist as soon as possible to be properly diagnosed and treated.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Saturday, 16 April 2022 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Excess pressure that is exerted on a bone in the foot can lead to a stress fracture. It can develop from practicing high-impact exercise, increasing speed and training too fast, or possible from poor nutrition. This type of injury develops slowly, and symptoms are often ignored. It can become difficult to complete daily activities, and it helps to temporarily stop the activity that caused the injury. After a proper diagnosis is made, which generally occurs when an X-ray is taken, treatment can begin. A walking boot or a cast may be helpful in stabilizing the foot as the healing process takes place. The average time for a stress fracture to heal is four to six weeks, and then a gradual return to the chosen activity is often advised. If you have a stress fracture, please consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can help you with the correct treatment plan.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Tuesday, 05 April 2022 00:00

Potential Causes for Sprained Ankles

People who unexpectedly twist their foot may experience a sprained ankle, which occurs as a result of overstretching the muscles, tendons and ligaments. The symptoms that often accompany a sprained ankle can include bruising, swelling, and difficulty moving the ankle. People who have weak ankles may be more susceptible to a sprain. It can help to improve ankle strength by performing specific exercises that are designed for the ankles. Additionally, it is a good idea to do warm up and cool down stretches before and after working out. Research has indicated it is beneficial to lose any extra weight in order to lessen the pressure that is exerted on the ankles. There are several treatment options for sprained ankles, and it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine which one is the best for you.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
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