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Please contact our office to schedule an appointment or for more information. To keep you and your loved ones safe, know that we have taken all recommended state and medical association precautions.

Hanover (717) 524-1034


October 2020

Monday, 26 October 2020 00:00

Methods That Can Help to Prevent Falling

Once a person falls, they have an increased risk of falling again. This can be caused by a fear of falling, and may prevent daily activities from being accomplished. Painful foot conditions may develop from falling, and it is beneficial to implement safety techniques in the household. These can include installing grab bars in the shower and toilet areas, and improving lighting in the living environment. Additionally, it is suggested that regular eye an hearing exams be completed yearly. An effective falls prevention technique can also consist of engaging in a routine exercise program, which can help to strengthen the body. If you would like more information about how falling can affect the feet along with successful prevention methods, please consult with a podiatrist.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
Thursday, 22 October 2020 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 19 October 2020 00:00

Why Diabetes Make Wounds Heal Slower

Did you know that approximately 30 million people in the United States live with diabetes? One frequent side effect of this condition is the development of wounds on the feet, known as diabetic foot wounds (DFUs). DFUs are slow to heal, do not heal well, and sometimes don’t heal at all. This increases the risk of getting an infection, which can come with a host of serious complications. But what is it about diabetes that makes DFUs heal so poorly? When blood glucose levels are permanently high, as they often are in people with diabetes, the function of white blood cells is impaired. Without the white blood cells working correctly, the body has more trouble closing wounds. Poor circulation, a frequent complication of diabetes, makes blood move more slowly. The blood becomes unable to supply nutrients to the wound efficiently, leading to poorer healing and a loss of feeling in the feet. Because of this, a person might get a cut or sore on their foot and not even be aware of it, delaying treatment and increasing infection risk. If you have diabetes, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for the appropriate foot care to prevent and treat DFUs.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

An ingrown toenail is a condition in which the corner of the toenail grows into the surrounding skin. It occurs most frequently on the big toe, and can affect both children and adults. This condition can be very painful, and may also cause redness, swelling, and tenderness around the affected nail. There are several things you can do to care for your child’s ingrown toenail at home, including soaking the affected toe in warm water and elevating the corner of the nail. However, if home care methods are ineffective, or if your child gets ingrown toenails frequently, then you should take them to a podiatrist for treatment.  

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Jim Maxka of South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Monday, 05 October 2020 00:00

Different Forms of Neuropathy

Research has indicated that many patients who have neuropathy may be diabetic. Peripheral neuropathy is defined as nerve damage that can affect the feet, and can happen from elevated glucose levels in the blood. It can cause the inability to feel sensation, and there may be muscle weakness and slowed reflexes. Patients who have autonomic neuropathy may experience difficulty in swallowing, or have abnormal blood pressures and heart rates. Damage that is inflicted on the hips, thighs, or legs may be indicative of radiculoplexus neuropathy, and this may be linked to diabetes. An additional form of neuropathy is referred to as mononeuropathy, and this may cause difficulty in focusing the eyes. If you are experiencing weakness or a lack of sensation in your feet, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy
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