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Hanover (717) 524-1034


Monday, 01 June 2020 00:00

Athlete’s foot is a contagious fungal skin infection. This fungal infection typically thrives in moist, warm environments. Not wearing the proper footwear in locations such as gyms, locker rooms, public swimming pools, and communal showers may increase your risk of getting this fungal infection. There are certain symptoms that are commonly associated with this condition. These may include itchy blisters on the feet, dry skin on the soles or sides of the feet, a stinging or burning sensation between the toes, and cracking or peeling of the skin between the toes. Some patients have found antifungal powder to be helpful in trying to relieve these symptoms. For a proper diagnosis and advised plan of treatment, it’s suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Tuesday, 26 May 2020 00:00

Morton’s neuroma is a foot condition caused by an enlarged nerve or thickening of tissue surrounding a nerve, most commonly between the third and fourth toes. Those who have experienced this condition often relay feeling pain in the ball of their foot. Common symptoms that can accompany Morton’s neuroma include burning in the ball of your foot that can also be reached in the toes, a numbing or tingling sensation felt in the toes, and feeling as if a pebble is stuck inside your shoe. To help relieve the discomfort of Morton’s neuroma, patients have found custom orthotics and acupuncture to be beneficial. In order to properly diagnose this condition and to receive prompt treatment, it’s suggested that you speak with a podiatrist for professional care and attention.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Jim Maxka of South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 25 May 2020 00:00

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning?

Monday, 18 May 2020 00:00

Many women choose to wear high heels for several reasons, despite knowing they may hurt their feet. These types of shoes can be stylish, and can accentuate a particular clothing style, in addition to making the legs appear slender. It is important to purchase the right size shoes, which may help to ensure maximum comfort. The toes may benefit when there is adequate room for them to move freely, and this can be accomplished by choosing shoes that have a round toe area. The feet may need to rest after wearing high heels, and it is recommended to alternate with shoes that have a lower heel. Foot conditions that may develop from frequently wearing high heels can consist of bunions, hammertoe, corns, and blisters. If you would like additional information about how high heels can impact the feet, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Jim Maxka from South Penn Foot & Ankle Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hanover, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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